January 07, 2014 | Wes Packer

Daniel Carey and Jim Killock discuss legal challenge to surveillance

First larger meeting of Cardiff-based ORG activists...


On 12 December, Daniel Carey and Jim Killock came to Cardiff to speak about ORG's most recent activities in challenging the UK digital surveillance regime. Carey, solicitor at Deighton Pierce Glynn, reported on a legal case which ORG and two other organisations have brought to the European Court of Human Rights. The group alleges the government acted illegally by breaching the privacy of millions of British and EU citizens, and that it broke Article 8 of the European Human Rights Act. Carey said there are good chances the legal challenge is successful, although it may take a while to be decided. In that case the UK government would have to revise the legal framework for privacy and surveillance.

Jim Killock, ORG Executive Director, explained the broader context of digital surveillance and what each of us can do to challenge mass     surveillance in the UK. Together with an audience of around 20 at the Quaker Meeting House in central Cardiff, the presenters discussed how the legal challenge can be part of a multi-pronged approach that also includes public campaigns, political advocacy, and technological solutions. Local ORG groups in other British cities have, for example, started letter campaigns to their MPs, or have organised cryptoparties to teach skills and exchange tools for anonymous digital communication.

The event was the first larger meeting of Cardiff-based ORG activists and other interested people from a diversity of backgrounds and a variety of interests. It was, perhaps, the start of a regular Cardiff ORG group. Ideas for future activities and events in Cardiff have already been raised. In January we will invite everyone for the next meeting. 

Watch this space, as well as the Meetup site: http://www.meetup.com/ORG-Cardiff/

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